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war, which is iraq, afghanistan, to some extent pakistan, possibly iran. this is the battle the united states is facing. the balance of power in the region, the iran iraqi, the indo-pakistani. each one of them have destabilized over 10 years. in the air of israel relationship, barring some dramatic change in egypt over time, israel is so dominant that it creates new realities on the ground. there's a difference to what the united states really says very often. in afghanistan the united states is asking pakistan to do things that create stability, that will weaken pakistan, that potentially cratered an independent regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the
and pakistan. with the help of pakistan. so i think that sometimes we just go from one end of greek allies, great friends which is what was your longtime, in the previous administration, two gosh, these guys are no good, et cetera. this is not the way to do business between two allies and partners. and i think we will not interpret the remarks as a letter. we understand them to be a reflection of american statement of policy, and the americans have the right to defend their homeland by ensuring that terrorists are plotting against the american homeland are dealt with. but as far as the other concern, we are very confident of our sovereignty. we would like to protect our sovereignty. and sovereignty requires that when operations take place in pakistan they should take place without knowledge and our participation. >> a quick follow. does that mean if there's a second rate, that your forces would fire on the rich? >> when i became ambassador to the united states, i went and saw very good colleague of mine, another professor of international, and i said i've been ambassador before but that wa
frankly operates a bit like the military in pakistan. it is a state within a state. they have their own economy and they had their own businesses and their revolution as it exists in egypt, the uprising as it exists, whatever you want to call it, has not yet focused on what will be that future role of this pebble in the room. the floor is open. yes. direct your question to somebody. push it up on the side, i think. [inaudible] the question is about yemen. when we talk about the arab spring and the uprising -- i would also like to hear little bit more about georgia. that seemed to be a key in the region. >> margot and david white at you say something about jordan and yemen. why would you start on yemen, the uprising of the yemen that has been going on for about a decade. and it has involved people from south yemen that are not too happy about the union of the two yemen's and the short end of the stick that they got. its minorities in the north near the saudi border that have had a revolution going on for several years and the tribal disputes. so there has been a long-standing conflict. d
of operations concerns about overreliance and sometimes tenuous surface lines of communication through pakistan for logistic support into afghanistan have fled over the past couple years the establishment of the northern distribution network through central asia. however, these northerners may need to be expanded to allow increased movement into an increasingly out of afghanistan that we are to maintain the quality and timeliness of that support to our afghanistan forces people be interested do hear general fraser's views on that. and again, our deepest thanks to you and your families for all the hue of done will do for the nation in the days ahead. senator mccain. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i woke on general odierno, admiral winnefeld, fraser a special thanks to their families and congratulate them on their nominations. i particularly want to recognize mr. tony odierno at, a distinguished wounded warrior and his hearer supporting his father. general odierno, i strongly support your rep nomination to the net chief of staff of the army. her critical role in iraq and a note you are one of the ve
, pakistan or egypt. and the two questions that i have, how many connections have there been -- convictions have there been over the last several years, do you have any -- and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? generally, when there's a problem, members go to the embassy, they advocate it. how many times has the american embassy participate and been involved in any different cases? >> thank you very much, mr. wolf. there have been, in the 50 cases i was involved with personally, there were two investigations, neither investigation resulted in any legal process, so there are no convictions, um, resulting as of, as of complaints to the effective kidnappings, forced marriages and forced converses of coptic christian women. to my knowledge, also, and according to my research the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one last thing, mr. chairman. as you have this record, i urge you to send it to leon panetta. our military has a very good relationship, in fact, as i think our military has a better relationship and more cl
, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard to find anybody, -- >> guest: that is true. but good governance brings us back to something like democratization. something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture that will sort of be a jerk to interview. but ill be something that people have a way to control and to change those are going to run their government. and this is something you can't avoid when the dictators flow, you don't put on the dictators
into pakistan is causing a huge number of attacks there. and so what's been occurring is not just a large number of suicide attacks but a large number of anti-american-inspired suicide attacks. >> so besides the obvious policy of pulling out, is there another policy? >> absolutely. >> to prevent this. >> because pulling out, simply abandons our interests, ignores our interests. what this book suggests is a middle ground policy called offshore balancing. offshore balancing continues to pursue our core security interests and obligations in overseas regions but does so with over the horizon, naval power, intelligence assets, relies on economic assets and political tools and this is the core policy that we pursue as the united states for decades in major regions of the world, such as the middle east with great success, and we should return to this policy. >> can you give us specifics about how we should pursue the policy in the middle east. >> in the 1970s and '80s, the united states had core interests in the middle east including the persian gulf and we maintained and secured those interests withou
. we had the times square bomber inspired by them and had trained with the taliban in pakistan. yes, there are broader links but there are a few things at work here. number 1 a crippling political correctness, absolutely crippling. i think another thing, quite frankly, is that it's very difficult -- say that islam is not a religion of peace. say shari'a is a threat, that's a very difficult thing to come to grips with because that means you're at good with a good slice of the muslim population who does follow muslim fundamentally. who does follow shari'a to the t. that's a scary thing to admit for our government. >> host: and i want to go back to that because no less a person than george bush right after 9/11 said islam is a religion of peace. right after the young comes vo radical muslim walked into the airport in frankfurt and shot a couple of american soldiers, barack obama said one of the islam is one of the world's great religions. my sense we want to believe that because we are a tolerant people. but you've got quotes in this book from several known terrorists and conspirators
-z. pages are scattered pakistan certainly as he was going along most of it was in his own hand, at least for the first dictionary. but i think for the second dictionary when his over aei think other people, he uses described or other people help them with the writing. >> you suggested that his obsessions and compulsions might have been hard on his family. was there any particular evidence of that? >> yes, he had a son, he had one son and six daughters. and his son never come his son was very bright and he studied classics at el but he never graduated. his letters are kind of sad. he was depressed. and he worked on the dictionary but because he didn't have a college degree he could never become if full long after. and i have since been noah webster's son was very difficult. his wife was, his wife kept an orderly house. a perfect fit for him, and she didn't complain but he had a sense that she was doing everything that she wanted, and it must've taken a toll on her, even if she doesn't talk about it explicitly in the letters. there's a sense he was very demanding but there's also letters t
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
persecuted because they are christians, whether it be in afghanistan, whether it be in pakistan or in the egypt and all over, the two questions that i have. how many convictions have there been over the last several years? and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? because generally been there is a problem for the members go to the and become the advocate for how many convictions do you know have been cases brought in the egyptian courts and how many times has the american embassy participated and been involved in any different case? >> thank you very much, mr. wolfe. there has been in the 50 cases of i was involved with personally, there were two investigations. meter investigation resulted in any legal process. so there are no convictions resulting as the complaints to the effect of kidnapping forced marriages and forced conversions of coptic christian women. to my knowledge also and according to my research, the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one nice thing, mr. chairman, as you have the record i u
, and nato in very essential and crucial issues against pakistan, libya, against piracy, the fight against national terrorism, and in the recent weeks, last five weeks as minister of finance i find myself in the battlefield of debt, deficit and economic growth. in his last five weeks, i've had the opportunity to really seal -- see the positives. the state of the eurozone sign july 21, and active participation of the private sector of this involvement, and addressing the problem of the greek population come is giving new momentum. [inaudible] inside and outside greece. i'm referring to greeks of diaspora, the greeks of american and the greek civil community which is the largest in the world. together, we will succeed in rebuilding our country, restoring its fiscal independence and achieving the competitive position in the international market. we can do this and we will do this. challenge for the primacy, the government and for me, the minister of finance. but by and large, it is a challenge for the greek people, a proud people with me skills. thank you very much. [applause] >> mr. minister
laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women from britain was given their lives in the fight against terrorism across the world. we should pay tribute especially to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was the man who is responsible for 9/11, which was not only an horrific killing of americans, but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as that of the family group for united airlines flight 93 put it, we erased obviously never to hope for some and that. we are willing to make the section in this case. our world is a better place without him. >> of understanding satisfaction of those who lost family members in the inferno of 9/11
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13